PHIL - Philosophy

PHIL 2010 Introduction to Philosophy (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the ideas of several philosophers on topics such as human reason, knowledge, justice, happiness, religion, and morality examined in their historical settings and for their impact on western civilization.

PHIL 2020 Critical Thinking (3-0-3) 

A systematic introduction to the discipline of correct reasoning. Emphasis is on the structure and criteria of good inductive and deductive argument, problem solving, and an analysis of relevant and irrelevant techniques of persuasion.

PHIL 2030 Moral Philosophy (3-0-3) 

An examination of the main theories of moral obligation and evaluation with application to current moral issues. Includes discussion of the ideas and procedures in analysis and judgment of moral problems.

PHIL 2500 Formal Logic (3-0-3) 

An introduction to contemporary techniques in logic with special attention given to deductive models and decision methods. Emphasis is placed on the application of logic to argument analysis, problem solving, foundations of mathematics, science, and computer science.

PHIL 3115 Ancient-Medieval Philosophy (3-0-3) 

A survey of the origin and developments in philosophical thought from ancient times to the beginning of the Modern era (Renaissance). The doctrines of the philosophers will be examined in relation to their cultural settings and for their relevance today.

Restriction(s):

Freshman or High School Dual Enrollment students may not enroll.

PHIL 3116 Modern-Contemporary Philosophy (3-0-3) 

A survey of the main development in philosophical thought from the beginning of the Modern Period (Renaissance) to the present. The doctrines of the philosophers will be examined in relation to their cultural settings and for their relevance today.

Restriction(s):

Freshman or High School Dual Enrollment students may not enroll.

PHIL 3117 Philosophy of Religion (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or any philosophy class. An examination of important aspects of religious belief: arguments about the existence of God, the relations between faith and reason, revelation, miracle, ethical values, and immortality.

Restriction(s):

Freshman or High School Dual Enrollment students may not enroll.

PHIL 3125 Religions of the World (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing. A philosophical study of influential world religions. Includes an analysis and comparison of major religions such as Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism.

Restriction(s):

Freshman or High School Dual Enrollment students may not enroll.

PHIL 3130 Existentialism (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or one philosophy course. A study of the 20th century philosophical and literary movement that addresses fundamental questions about the meaning of human existence. Classic existentialist themes such as the "death of God," freedom, despair, absurdity and authenticity will be explored through a study of figures such as Soren Kierkegaard, Friedrich Nietzsche, Martin Heidegger and Jean Paul Sartre.

Restriction(s):

Freshman students may not enroll.

PHIL 3145 Philosophy of Science (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing. A study of recent issues in the philosophy of science such as the nature of explanation, observation and theory, debates concerning scientific rationality as well as the debate concerning science versus pseudo-science.

Restriction(s):

Freshman or High School Dual Enrollment students may not enroll.

PHIL 3146 Contemporary Moral Issues (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing (or higher) or one philosophy course. A look at how philosophical analysis can help us think about some of the moral issues facing us today. This course will look at the links between moral theory and particular moral issues. Some examples of moral issues that might be discussed would be the environment, drug laws, distributive justice, concerns about privacy, capital punishment, world hunger, affirmative action or euthanasia.

Restriction(s):

Freshman students may not enroll.

PHIL 3150 Social and Political Philosophy (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing (or higher) or one philosophy course. Social and Political philosophy addresses questions about the nature of society as well as the question of how we ought to organize society. This course will emphasize some of the historically influential answers to these questions. Possible figures might include Plato (who thought that we should be governed by philosophers), Thomas Hobbes (who emphasize the need for order), John Locke (who thought of society as being formed to protect a few basic rights), Jean-Jacques Rousseau (who thought of the challenge for society as being a restoration of the freedom from being subjected to the will of another), Karl Marx (who is concerned to produce a society where workers are not alienated from their labor), Auguste Comte (trying to provide a scientific basis for social organization), Emile Durkheim (who thought of society as an organism), or John Rawls (who was concerned with how a society should distribute resources).

Restriction(s):

Freshman students may not enroll.

PHIL 3575 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing or any philosophy course. An examination of selected subjects of philosophical interest. Topics may include theories of knowledge, environmental issues, eastern philosophies, or any subject not explicitly covered in the curriculum, and may be cross-disciplinary or limited in scope. When offered, the specific topic for this course will be listed in the course schedule booklet.

Restriction(s):

Freshman or High School Dual Enrollment students may not enroll.

PHIL 3795 Philosophy Seminar (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing or any philosophy course. A seminar on various issues of philosophical interest. Topics may be specialized or cross-disciplinary in nature. When offered, the topic for the seminar will be listed in the course schedule booklet.

Restriction(s):

Freshman or High School Dual Enrollment students may not enroll.

PHIL 3899 Independent Study (3-0-3) 

Individual research on philosophical subjects under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Bibliography and research paper required. Prior agreement with instructor is necessary before enrollment.

Restriction(s):

Enrollment limited to students in the Department Prerequisite college.